Peter Hoffman is Vice President of Intellectual Property Management for The Boeing Company, the world’s largest aerospace company. Hoffman is responsible for strategies that protect and generate the highest possible value from this significant corporate asset. Hoffman specifically manages the company’s patent portfolio; protection of trade secrets; and licensing of technical data, images, consumer products, trademarks and patents. Hoffman, 57, reports to Boeing Chief Technology Officer Greg Hyslop.

Before his current appointment, Hoffman served as director of global research and development strategy for Boeing Research & Technology, the company’s advanced research organization. In that role, he was responsible for developing technology collaboration relationships with companies, universities and national laboratories around the world.

Hoffman played a leadership role in the expansion of Boeing’s global technology engagement, and he was instrumental in the establishment of research centres in Australia, India and China and numerous technology relationships in Europe, Asia, the Middle East and the Americas.

Hoffman earned a bachelor of science degree in mechanical engineering technology and a master’s of science degree in mechanical engineering from the University of Tennessee, a master’s of manufacturing engineering from Washington University in St. Louis, and a master’s of international business from St. Louis University. Hoffman is a board member of the Advanced Manufacturing Research Centre Group at the University of Sheffield in the United Kingdom, an Advisory Board member at the University of Tennessee College of Engineering, and a Fellow of the Royal Aeronautical Society.

 

I’m inspired by the people and teams at Boeing that make it look easy, when I know it is very difficult.

 

What attracted you to the aerospace sector?

I was mechanically inclined as a child and enjoyed drawing and have always been amazed by flying machines.  Seeing an aircraft or space ship take flight still inspires me to this day.

 

What is your vision for Boeing’s future in the UK?

Boeing already has a strong presence in the UK; Boeing and its legacy companies have supported the Royal Air Force and commercial customers in the United Kingdom for 80 years.  We’ve also doubled our own workforce in the UK since 2011, and our spending with the UK supply chain–about £2.1 billion last year alone–has since tripled.

We are constantly looking for new and innovative ways to meet our customers’ needs.  I am excited that we’re building our first European manufacturing facility in South Yorkshire. Boeing Sheffield will open up a range of new opportunities for local employees, suppliers and partners and will expand our long-term relationship with UK industry, academia and government.

  

If you could change one element of technology, or a particular type of technology in the sector, what would that be?

Streamlining the path to certification.  The rate of change and ability to leverage new innovations is often inhibited by the cost and time required to gain certification for new technologies.

 

What is the best piece of advice you’ve ever been given?

When asking a trusted mentor many years ago about a full-time career move to international sales, he advised that I stay on my current path of keeping one foot in the technical world and one in the business world.  I took that advice and the white space between these worlds has made for very interesting work.

 

What are your key successes to date?

My most rewarding professional moment to date has been seeing Boeing break ground for Boeing Sheffield in September of this year.  Boeing Sheffield will be a 6,200-square metre building located adjacent to the Advanced Manufacturing Research Centre (AMRC), a world-class research campus that Boeing co-founded with the University of Sheffield in 2001 and a partnership that I have been a part of since its inception.  It feels like 16 years ago we had a vision and a dream, and that dream has come true.  Boeing Sheffield for me symbolises how brave and open-minded Boeing is, and I’m honoured to work with inspirational visionary colleagues every day.

 

Describe your ideal day away from work?

A strong cup of coffee in the morning catching up on the news and pottering around my kitchen followed by getting some exercise and spending time with my family in the evening enjoying a good meal and a movie.

 

Who inspires you the most?

My Boeing teammates.  It is truly amazing the level of expertise and innovation it takes to be a leader in the aerospace industry and I’m inspired by the people and teams at Boeing that make it look easy when I know it is very difficult.

 

What is your golden rule?

Treat others as you wish to be treated

Gary was appointed Chief Executive of the Aerospace Technology Institute (ATI) in April 2014, assuming responsibility for the strategic direction of the institute and its operational performance. Prior to this, Gary was the Chief Executive of Hybrid Air Vehicles Ltd a private equity backed aerospace OEM. During his tenure Gary led the business from its start-up phase into a mature business, winning and delivering a $600m contract for the US Army.

Previously Gary held a number of senior level positions within BAE SYSTEMS, NG Bailey and HBOS, working across a number of international markets. Gary holds a first class honours in Aeronautical Engineering from the Queens University of Belfast and an MBA from the Cranfield School of Management.

Don’t let anyone tell you it can’t be done!

 

What attracted you to the aerospace sector?

It’s quite simple really. As a young boy I was obsessed by aeroplanes which led me to study Aeronautical Engineering at University and subsequently take a career in it!

 

What is your vision for the UK aerospace sector in the next 15 – 20 years?

For it to grow in depth and breadth, building on its current industry and academic strengths whilst bringing in new disruptive technologies and ideas.

 

If you could change one element of technology, or a particular type of technology in the sector, what would that be?

Modularisation- the build process in my view is not as efficient as it should be and there are still too many parts!

 

What is the best piece of advice you’ve ever been given?

Stay focused on your goals!

 

What are your key successes to date?

In the ATI I’m very proud to have recruited a great team and played my part in setting up a business model which delivers success for industry, academia and government.

 

Describe your ideal day away from work?

These days that would probably involve me hanging out with my children. Outside that I’m very happy playing golf in the sun.

 

Who inspires you the most?

Visionary entrepreneurs.

 

What is your golden rule?

Don’t let anyone tell you it can’t be done!

James was appointed as Institute’s Chief Strategy Officer in September 2014. James’ primary responsibility is to lead the development of the ATI strategy, and to develop and manage the ATI’s project approval and monitoring process. Prior to this, James was an engagement manager with Booz and Company, a leading strategy consulting firm. During his time in consulting, James helped clients across aviation, defence, pharmaceuticals and consumer goods sectors to solve a range of strategic and operational challenges. Previously, James worked for Ricardo UK Ltd, an automotive engineering consultancy as a transmission specialist and project manager.

James holds a first class honours in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Bath, an MBA from the Kellogg School of Management and a Master in Engineering Management from the McCormick School of Engineering, Northwestern University.

Put who before how.  People are central to achieving things.

 

What attracted you to the aerospace sector?

The products and technology.  What the industry achieves never ceases to amaze me, and most people take flying for granted now – I’m certainly not one of them! The UK has a proud history of pioneering aviation. The opportunity to play a part in ensuring it continues to be a major force for progress and shaping the future of air travel attracted me to the industry and specifically the Aerospace Technology Institute.

 

What is your vision for the UK aerospace sector in the next 15 – 20 years?

I believe the next 20 years will look and feel different to the last 20 years.  New competitors, rapidly evolving technology, radical ideas and changing public expectations being driven beyond the sector’s boundaries will lead to more disruption, in its many forms.  Navigating this will require agility, great technology and smart people.  UK be pioneer once again in this age, and be where things happen first.

 

If you could change one element of technology, or a particular type of technology in the sector, what would that be?

Batteries – 10 times the energy density, easily processed and recycled!  Going electric is essential to cracking the environmental challenge and batteries are central to this.

 

What is the best piece of advice you’ve ever been given?

Put who before how.  People are central to achieving things.

 

What are your key successes to date?

Helping to create ATI along with my stellar colleagues.

 

Describe your ideal day away from work?

On the ski slopes, on a wind surfer or on the bike!  I love to get out doors and active.

 

Who inspires you the most?

I’d cite a group of people – entrepreneurs.  There are so many amazing stories of people who’ve gone out and solved problems with very little but their drive and its hugely impressive.

 

What is your golden rule?

Passion and perseverance matter more than ability.

 

James is one of our keynote speakers at ATI Conference 2017: Realising Ambition, and will be speaking on Day One.

 

 

In April 2017, Paul Stein was appointed to the Executive Leadership Team as Chief Technology Officer.

Paul joined Rolls-Royce in 2010 as Chief Scientific Officer and for two years acted as the Engineering and Technology Director for the Company’s Nuclear business in addition to his Chief Scientific Officer responsibilities. His most recent role was Director of Research & Technology, accountable for the company’s global investment in R&T, as well as fostering innovation and promoting and sustaining specialist engineering talent.

Paul was Director General, Science and Technology, at the UK Ministry of Defence immediately prior to joining Rolls-Royce. Before that, he was Managing Director of Roke Manor Research and in 2003 was appointed to the Siemens UK Executive Management Board, leading technology and contributing to business strategy.

Paul holds an Electrical and Electronic Engineering degree from King’s College, London. He is a Fellow of the Royal Academy of Engineering, the Royal Aeronautical Society and the Institution of Engineering and Technology.

 

Never underestimate the ability of technologists to solve difficult problems, especially when they’re not told it’s difficult.

 

What attracted you to the aerospace sector?

Aerospace propulsion and the conquest of flight is one of mankind’s most interesting challenges. It beats anything else I’ve worked on.

 

What is your vision for the UK aerospace sector in the next 15 – 20 years?

That the UK aerospace industry will remain competitive on a global scale with existing technologies while rapidly preparing for the future. Whatever tomorrow brings, the industry will be ready for it. The UK has an outstanding aerospace industry and over the next 15 years it will continue to produce more sustainable, more advanced and more impressive technology, and will become the centre for key areas of global research.

 

If you could change one element of technology, or a particular type of technology in the sector, what would that be?

I think one element that needs to change is to accept we now live in multi-disciplinary world where the solution to any challenge may lie in combinations of traditional and emerging technologies. We need to be less ‘stove piped’ in our outlook on technology.

 

What is the best piece of advice you’ve ever been given?

Never underestimate the ability of technologists to solve difficult problems, especially when they’re not told it’s difficult.

 

What are your key successes to date?

The repositioning of Rolls-Royce from a mechanical engineering company to a company which views engineering and technology on a broader landscape. It makes me very proud to guide the team of incredible and dedicated Rolls-Royce employees that are driving this change.

 

Describe your ideal day away from work?

A quiet day spent with my Raspberry-Pi projects – finishing off all the projects and ideas that I have started but never quite had the time to complete.

 

Who inspires you the most?

I draw inspiration from all of the outstanding engineers and scientists that I have worked with. Each one of them has shared or taught me something that is unique, contributing to me a little bit in their own way.

 

What is your golden rule?

The principle I try to stand by at all times is to always assume positive intent in others.

 

Paul will be one of our keynote speakers at ATI Conference 2017: Realising Ambition, and will be speaking on Day Two.

The UK Government Department for Business, Energy & Industry Strategy (BEIS) has just published an independent evaluation report on the Aerospace Technology Institute (ATI) R&D Programme.

The report focuses on the effectiveness and implementation of the application, assessment and monitoring process used by ATI, BEIS and Innovate UK to deliver ATI R&D Programme.

Ipsos MORI, global market and opinion research specialists, conducted a thorough and independent review of the ATI R&D programme during 2016 and 2017.  Their work involved analysis of several years’ worth of programme data, as well as completing more than 50 interviews with participating companies and research partners and with more than 20 policy stakeholders involved in the delivery process.

The report identifies that the ATI has been effective in creating a UK Technology Strategy, Raising Ambition, and engaging with the UK aerospace sector to develop ambitious technology proposals.  The application process for R&D grant funding was also shown to be appropriate, fair and proportionate – providing high-quality and constructive feedback to applicants and ensuring clear and well-defined project objectives.

Recent public announcements by Boeing, Rolls-Royce and GE Dowty Propellers have highlighted the positive impacts that the ATI R&D Programme is having on growing UK aerospace supply chain capabilities and competitiveness, boosting levels of R&D and securing inward investment.  The ATI R&D Programme is therefore considered to be on track to deliver long-term economic benefits to the UK, as set out in our recent INSIGHT paper; The Economic Impact of UK Aerospace Industrial Strategy.

The report made some constructive recommendations, including:

  • efficiency and speed of the application process
  • engagement of small and medium enterprises (SMEs)
  • investments in disruptive technologies
  • monitoring of project outcomes and subsequent exploitation

ATI welcomes the Ipsos MORI report. It has highlighted successes and provided constructive suggestions on how the ATI R&D Programme can become even more effective in securing economic value.” commented Peter Willis, Senior Economist at ATI.

ATI, BEIS and Innovate UK have already created an active working group, which is seeking to implement a number of the report’s key recommendations during 2018.  The Programme has held several lean workshops with industry, aiming to reduce the length of time to approve projects by half.

“We are on track to make improvements during 2018 that will ensure the ATI R&D programme continues to be internationally competitive and attract greater investment in UK aerospace – this will save applicants time and cost, and enhance decision making in the process”, commented Thomas Edgar, Strategic Portfolio Manager at ATI.

ATI is also seeking to engage more with SMEs through its investment in NATEP, and is currently scoping an open and collaborative competition for investments in supply chain and disruptive technologies.

Dr Simon Weeks was appointed Chief Technology Officer of the Aerospace Technology Institute (ATI) in September 2014, assuming responsibility for technology leadership of the ATI. Prior to joining the institute, Simon spent most of his professional career in Rolls-Royce, most recently as Head of Aerospace Research & Technology leading the global research and technology programme for future jet engines for Rolls-Royce.

Before this, Simon has held a number of other senior technical leadership roles in Rolls-Royce including Director of engineering operations for Aero Engine Controls (a RR-Goodrich Joint venture company) and Technical Director for Eurojet in Munich (leading the development of the EJ200 engine for the Eurofighter Typhoon aircraft). In his time in Rolls-Royce, Simon worked over half of his career in research & technology activities.

Simon is a chartered engineer and a Fellow of the Royal Aeronautical Society. He gained a MA in chemistry and a DPhil in the electro-chemistry of fuel cells at Oxford University.

 

Always do the right thing as an engineer.

 

What attracted you to the aerospace sector?

Being taken to Yeovilton Air Show as a young boy – experiencing the awe-inspiring take-off of the English electric lightnings – the power, noise and excitement and the smell of kerosene! – it has stayed with me ever since. I was then very lucky to have the opportunity to change careers to aerospace in my late 20’s and I never looked back.

 

What is your vision for the UK aerospace sector in the next 15 – 20 years?

Over that time, we’ll see new generations of aircraft that are ever more environmentally friendly – burning less fuel, making less CO2, less NOx, even quieter…Oh and more comfortable than today. I hope to be flying in an electric air taxi within the next 20 years too!

 

If you could change one element of technology, or a particular type of technology in the sector, what would that be?

Batteries that could store several times the amount of power as those that we have today – that would be revolutionary for aerospace.

 

What is the best piece of advice you’ve ever been given?

Always do the right thing as an engineer.

 

What are your key successes to date?

Leading the development and qualification of the EJ200 engine for the Eurofighter Typhoon which has turned out really well – a tremendously powerful engine and highly reliable – pilots love it! Being one of the ‘founding fathers’ of Aero-Engine Controls joint venture between Rolls-Royce and Goodrich. Leading the Rolls-Royce global aerospace R&T programme. Last but not least, creating the ATI with my colleagues and developing the UK’s national aerospace technology strategy.

 

Describe your ideal day away from work?

A day with family and friends with great food and wine and then playing a gig with my band in the evening where I would have roadies to shift and set up my kit and a limo waiting outside!!

 

Who inspires you the most?

The great engineers and scientists that I’ve had the privilege to work with.

 

What is your golden rule?

Always do the right thing as an engineer!

 

Simon will be one of our keynote speakers at ATI Conference 2017: Realising Ambition, and will be speaking on Day Two.

Dr Fassi Kafyeke joined Bombardier in 1982. In 1996 he became Chief of Advanced Aerodynamics, responsible for the design and testing for all Business Jets, Regional jets and the CSeries airliner. In 2007 he became Director of Strategic Technology and since 2015 is a Senior Director and a member of the Bombardier Product Development Engineering Leadership team, responsible for technology innovation, products innovation and Eco-design.

Fassi Kafyeke has an Aerospace Engineering Master’s degree from Université de Liège, a Master’s degree (Air Transport Engineering) from the Cranfield Institute of Technology and a PhD (Aerodynamics) from École Polytechnique de Montréal.

Always seek excellence, even if it requires more effort upfront, because excellence is always the best choice.

 

What attracted you to the aerospace sector?

The dream of flying and the challenge of designing beautiful airplanes.

 

What is your vision for the UK aerospace sector in the next 15 – 20 years?

The UK aerospace sector has all the elements needed to succeed in the future:  A strong aviation tradition, a diversified industrial foundation, and key universities and research centres specialised in aviation. With continued strong support from the UK government for collaborative research and technology, the sector can focus its research on key technology areas that will help ensure its future competitiveness.

 

If you could change one element of technology, or a particular type of technology in the sector, what would that be?

Thermodynamic propulsion.  We still need to burn fuel to power airplanes, thus producing noise and greenhouse gases.  If we could move to electric propulsion, this would make our industry cleaner.

 

What is the best piece of advice you’ve ever been given?

To be always rigorous and seek excellence

 

What are your key successes to date?

The very innovative airplanes produced by Bombardier and sold worldwide in the business jet and commercial airline markets.  Innovations include the Belfast-generated composite wing technology for the C Series aircraft.

 

Describe your ideal day away from work?

A quiet day in a botanical garden with a good historical thriller book.

 

Who inspires you the most?

In my profession, Theodore Von Karman

 

What is your golden rule?

Always seek excellence, even if it requires more effort upfront, because excellence is always the best choice.

 

 

Fassi will be one of our keynote speakers at ATI Conference 2017: Realising Ambition, and will be speaking on Day One.

 

Dr Jaiwon Shin is the NASA Associate Administrator for the Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate. In this position he manages the agency’s aeronautics research portfolio and guides its strategic direction. This portfolio includes research in the fundamental aeronautics of flight, aviation safety and the nation’s airspace system.

Dr Shin co-chairs the National Science & Technology Council’s Aeronautics Science & Technology Subcommittee. Comprised of federal departments and agencies that fund aeronautics-related research, the subcommittee wrote the nation’s first presidential policy for aeronautics research and development (R&D). The policy was established by Executive Order 13419 in December 2006 and will guide U.S. aeronautics R&D programs through 2020. The subcommittee finished writing the National Aeronautics R&D Plan in December 2007 and is currently writing the Research, Development, Test and Evaluation Infrastructure Plan, both of which were called for by the Executive Order.

 

Be humble. Know there are much smarter people than you in the room.

 

What do you find most interesting about aviation?

Making an impossible act of flying possible.

 

What is your vision for the aviation sector in the next 15 – 20 years?

Opening up the skies of major cities with quiet, safe, efficient, and environmentally acceptable air vehicles that will alleviate congestion on the ground.

 

If you could change one element of technology, or a particular type of technology in the sector, what would that be?

Enabling commercial supersonic flight that is affordable and environmentally acceptable.

 

What is the best piece of advice you’ve ever been given?

Balance your seesaw – meaning don’t just give praises and compliments to people. Must be able to give constructive and timely feedback to people for improvement as well.

 

What are your key successes to date?

  • Establishing NASA Aeronautics R&D more relevant and impactful to community needs
  • Building strong partnerships with industry, other government agencies, academia, and international agencies.

 

Describe your ideal day away from work?

Lie down on the warm beach and read a book.

 

Who inspires you the most?

Neil Armstrong – I was inspired to pursue my aviation career by watching the Apollo 11 moon landing. Later I met and worked with Neil Armstrong. He was a true gentleman with wisdom and humility.

 

What is your golden rule?

Be humble. Know there are much smarter people than you in the room.

 

Dr Shin will be one of our keynote speakers at ATI Conference 2017: Realising Ambition, and will be speaking on Day Two.

Robert joined Roland Berger’s London office in 2000 as an expert in the aerospace, defence and aviation sectors. He advises clients mainly in the aerospace and defence industry, including many of the world’s leading companies in these sectors. His consulting activities focus on strategy, mergers & acquisitions and operational performance improvement.

The constant change in the aerospace sector can be very exciting, there is always something new to explore.

 

 

What do you find most interesting about the aerospace sector?

The constant change within the sector – there is always something different going on, and some new area to explore, whether in design, development, production, or after-sales support.

 

What is your prediction for the future of the UK aerospace sector?

It all depends on whether the UK is prepared to invest in a High-Value Design centre in order to protect and enhance our ability to control and influence the early stage of design of the next generation of aerospace platforms. If so, then I can see the UK continuing to prosper in the aerospace sector; if not, I think that there is a very real risk that our skills and influence will atrophy, and the aerospace sector will follow other UK industrial sectors into long-term decline.

 

What is the best piece of advice you’ve ever been given?

To step back from the detail and pressures of day-to-day (or minute-to-minute) activities and think about the situation from a strategic perspective. I learned this from my Director of Studies at Cambridge, and have never forgotten it.

 

What are your key successes to date?

Working on some of the largest and most challenging new aircraft and engine programmes within the aerospace sector. I have been very fortunate to have been close to many of the most high-profile activities within the sector, and to have been able to work with various organisations at the forefront of the challenges which the industry faces.

 

Describe your ideal day away from work?

Based on my summer holiday, a good walk in the mountains of Colorado. I finally managed to finish the Colorado Trail this year, and relished the peace and quiet away from work with no phone signal.

 

Who inspires you the most?

From a work perspective, Peter Drucker. I have just been re-reading The Effective Executive – written in the 1950s, this book still has great lessons for today on subjects such as prioritisation and time management.

 

What is your golden rule?

Every project is different, and there is always something interesting within each project, particularly in aerospace.

 

Robert will be one of our keynote speakers at ATI Conference 2017: Realising Ambition, and will be speaking on Day One.

 

 

Paul is Chief Technology Officer at Airbus, where he leads the research, technology, and innovation activities across the company globally and is responsible for technologies for future generations of Airbus products and services. Previously, Paul was the founding CEO of A3, Airbus’ Silicon Valley innovation center charged with pursuing projects disruptive to the core business.

Before joining Airbus, Paul was an executive at Google, Motorola, and DARPA. Earlier in his career, he was an aerospace design engineer, the chief engineer for an unmanned aircraft program, and a management consultant focusing on technology, innovation, and M&A strategies. Paul has undergraduate and Master’s degrees in aeronautics from MIT and Caltech, respectively, and a law degree from Georgetown University. He is also a licensed pilot.

Imagine what you would do if you knew you could not fail.

What attracted you to the aerospace sector?

The chance to work on some of the most complex and majestic products that our civilisation has ever devised.

 

What is your vision for the UK aerospace sector in the next 15 – 20 years?

I think it’s foolish for me to try and predict anything 15-20 years into the future! The tech and the world changes far too quickly for that. The UK has been a leader in aerospace for the past century. It has the ingredients of a top-notch education system, an entrepreneur-friendly business environment, concerted government investment, and a pioneering spirit, to maintain and build further on this position in the future. We just have to make sure these ingredients stay in place!

 

If you could change one element of technology, or a particular type of technology in the sector, what would that be?

I would ask the genie to give us an infinitesimally light, emission free, and infinitely powerful source of propulsive energy.

 

What is the best piece of advice you’ve ever been given?

Imagine what you would do if you knew you could not fail. Now go do that anyway.

 

What are your key successes to date?

For me, the most gratifying part of any job is getting something to fly (or launch) for the first time. And I am proud of the fact that this has happened in pretty much every job I’ve had.

 

Describe your ideal day away from work?

Wine. Books. Friends & loved ones. Somewhere beautiful.

 

Who inspires you the most?

My partner, Rolan Flournoy, who is the happiest person I have ever met.

 

What is your golden rule?

Stay flexible and avoid golden rules.

 

Paul will be one of our keynote speakers at ATI Conference 2017: Realising Ambition, and will be speaking on Day One.